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Susan Glaspell “Trifles” Essay Analysis

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The idea of Drama has been derived from the very aspect of a person’s lifestyle; drama is acting out a person’s emotions through monologues, dialogues, speech, and song and dance. It involves a complete artistic expression of the journey of one’s feelings. Many authors since the inception of literature itself have indulged in drama in order to portray an emphasis on the way their thought process is channeled in a particular direction. Female writers such as Chopin and Fern and Glaspell’s involvement in the Provincetown Players strongly influenced the creation of Glaspell’s play ‘Trifles’. For example, Kate Chopin is the renowned American author of stories like ‘Story of an Hour’ depicting a dramatic monologue in order to display the feelings of a woman who has been oppressed under her husband’s reign and the feeling of liberation she gets when she finds out that he is no longer a part of the world. Dramas come from a variety of themes, mostly in order to portray a social message and help to uplift the people.

From olden day works of Shakespeare to the modern take of the ‘Vagina Monologues, a depiction of a woman’s journey, the drama has been a part and parcel of communication. The same has been stated in Glaspell’s ‘Trifles’ where the author has talked about focusing on different sets and scenes in order to emphasize the emotions and feelings of a person. She has been further able to influence a number of writers all over by talking about the importance of characters and their characteristics as well. However, it must be kept in mind that where a short story has the leverage of containing a plot as well as leaving the reader to his own thoughts by the end of the pages, a drama is different because the emphasis is laid more on the script and the countenances of the actors rather than the plot; ultimately, every moment makes the other in a drama whereas a story can only be read whole together and not in parts.

Works Cited
Susan Glaspell “Trifles.” Glaspell. Web. 12 Mar. 2012.

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